Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote -- as some have projected. the phone records of all of us in this room reside in an nsa database. i have said repeatedly just because we have the ability to collect huge amounts of data does not mean that we should be doing so. the collection of internet meta- data was shut down because it
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote , analysts charged with providing information that is useful. in that regard, they try to be judicious about choosing when to do a second or third hop. those are always exercised. they do not always exercise a second half for all numbers
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 9:00pm EDT
without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the living rooms >> how did you get that in your -- how did you get that in your head? we had a protest and a demonstration. we knew that we had to do it at the same time, to make the the 6:00,ws, to be on six 30 p.m., seven :00, 10:00, 11:00. -- 6:30 p.m., 7:00 p.m. they were just sitting there orderly reading a book, looking straight ahead. and then well-dressed you had the other element that would come up and pour hot water on us, the other elements, the racist elements. people saw the contrast. in birmingham, using dogs on young children. the american people could not take it. were saying to the mustess, to members, you do something. that is why president kennedy called that meeting in june 1963 and he spoke up and said, mr. president, the black marchers are restless and we're going to march on washington and president kennedy started moving aroun
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 12:00am EDT
movement. i have already mentioned congressman lewis reminds us of the contributions. they lift our hearts. chaplain black and the revel in reverend -- they lift our spirits. all of the seats filled in this hall of national memory remind us of the many thousands who made their way from every corner of this nation. through great effort, to be here on august 28, 1963. for an event they would never forget. for an event that we as a nation must never forget. thank you. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, jesse norman performing a version of >> ladies and gentlemen, jesse norman performing a version of the song performed at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singi
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 8:00am EDT
of meaning to us. and we have great sympathy for the fact that this is an enormously complicated process that they're, that they are going through. what we have asked of the fcc commissioners is more traction parent si -- transparency, more engagement. it might be conventional wisdom that if broadcasters want to stop this -- actually, i think it's in our interests to accelerate this to the degree possible while still getting it right. because this has enormous consequence to the nation that there is a dedicated and healthy broadcast band dedicated to broadcasting if we're serious about preserving video on a large scale that is free and that is local. these things are hugely important to people. in the information age, people still care about gathering around their big screens and watching sporting events or getting emergency information or staying up with the news. it comes there broadcasting in a very significant way. so we, we gave up a lott of spectrum -- a lot of spectrum when we went from analog to digital. we're being asked for more. but i think it's important to understand
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 7:00am EDT
public safety related use of you a/s and think hazardous material spills, search for lost children and that type of thing does the aclu have concerns about those types of applications of small you a fs? >> in general we do not. we are happy to see drones used for specific operations whether it is search and rescue, disaster response, police used in particular operations, police have a warrant to storm the state and want to use the drone as part of the operation we have no problem with that. we think those are a lot of good uses for drones in those areas. there might be particular rules that need to be worked out around if a drone is being used to search for somebody and it happens to fly over private people's houses and the backyard we think there should be rules that govern how those are handled and the sharing of them so people whose houses happened to be flown over the privacy that is dated but we're focused on that surveillance, watching everybody all the time. we think drones have technology that has a lot of potential to do good and really it is in everybody's interest to pin dow
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 6:00am EDT
work and legacy of so many people that have gone on before us. 50 years ago today, in a symbolic shadow of abraham lincoln my father stood in this very spot and declared to this nation his dream to let freedom ring all the people being manacled by a system of discrimination. he commissioned us to go back to our various cities, towns, hamlets, states and villages and let freedom ring. the reverberation of the sound of that freedom message has amplified and echoed since 1963 through the decades and coast to coast throughout this nation and even around the world. and as we are summoned again back to these hallowed grounds to send out a clarion call to let freedom ring. since that time, as a result of the civil rights act of 1964, voting rights act of 1965, the fair housing act of 1968, we have witnessed great strides toward freedom for all regardless of race, color, gender, relying, national origin, disability, class or sexual orientation. 50 years later in this year of jubilee, we are standing once again in the shadow of that great emancipator, having been summoned to these hallowed groun
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 9:00pm EDT
. that tells us much about the time she lived in. the civil war and into a time where technological innovation and significant social forces usher in an era of the norm is change for the united states. good evening and welcome to c- span's continuing series on america's first ladies. tonight, you will learn about lucy webb hayes. the wife of rutherford the hayes. here to start us off is a first ladies historian and author of a collection of biographies. welcome. in 1876, the country is joyously celebrating the 100th centennial of the declaration of independence and it is an election year. the election is greatly contested with no clear victor. tell us about the atmosphere with which it was at the white house. what was it like? >> susan, it is pretty schizophrenic, to tell you the truth. we had just come out of the centennial celebration. they were coming to the white house, but they do not know if they will move into the white house. the election is not yet decided. what happened is samuel and rutherford b. hayes were in one of the closest elections in the united states at that poin
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 9:00pm EDT
york city that they can tune to them and leave us alone. >> i will let you go there. thanks for your comments. a reminder that you can see the debate again on c-span2 with a preview at midnight, and more conversation coming up on c-span and c-span radio tomorrow morning. on washington journal, a preview of the president's 2 -- dave was to her, and with the cato institute, a report on the rising costs of social security disability insurance, and looking at the future of the lockheed martin lightning two strike fighter program, and then a senior contributor for defense on his article on what the nsa were charged probably looks like, all of that tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. on c-span and c-span radio, and tomorrow, a two -- they bus to her, talking about college costs syracuse, newin york, that will be live on c- hall is backe town tomorrow night. we start at 7:00 30 eastern, and education will be the education will be the focus. we hope you join us tomorrow night for c-span townhall. >> season two of first ladies begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of edi
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 11:00pm EDT
along well. it was a good colleague. >> use still in touch with don rumsfeld and dick cheney? >> dick was over in london. i had the privilege of being the leader with jim baker of the american delegation. when dick showed up there. his wife. there were good friends. so we had a chance to see him. he is amazing to me and he went. i said, you are looking great. three very hard years, our replacement and someone. he is looking great, feeling great. catch up with these people. >> host: what about secretary rumsfeld? >> guest: i don't see a lot of them, but i am in touch with him. he has a new book coming out. i wrote a little blurb for it. it is unknown unknowns and no knowns and that stuff. interesting book. >> host: what was your relationship to margaret thatcher? >> guest: i had a really good relationship with marker. often we argued. she is a pretty fierce argue were. when she does not like something people to say, oh, yes, margaret. we would go at it. the underlying way of thinking about things was similar, so a lot was constructed by the reagan-thatcher relationship, and i
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 1:00am EDT
using the upstairs bedroom a lot more frequently. she converted the downstairs kitchen into an open reception room and had the kitchen moved into the back part of the house. most significantly was the construction of the presidential library. she started to make a lot of changes to the property. i am standing in the room that he used as an office for the years that he was living here in the house. lucretia garfield called this the general snuggery. this room looks pretty much how it did. she did make a few minor changes in here, "in memorium" is carved in the wood. it does have an interesting double meaning. it was also the title of james and lucretia's favorite poem. he became a first-time member of the house of representatives. the first born child, eliza died. she was only two or three. this was very tragic and it brought them much closer together than they have been. two weeks or so after the daughter's death, he told lucretia that he had been not reading this poem, "in memorial" by alfred lord tennyson. it should bring him as much comfort as it did to him. when lucretia garfiel
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2013 1:00am EDT
, democratic leader, my colleagues. i'm going to try and sum up the president's presentation to us today in just a few words. i would say a better life for america's middle class. we have been hearing a lot this year about a grand bargain, how to reduce the deficit, how to pay down the debt. how we go about trying to create jobs. all of us would agree that the one constant that is without the entire stream of things has been the growing inequality that exists in our system. i saw it described a couple days ago as our country is determined with the least amount of opportunity and the most inequality in our society. the president was very focused on what we need to do to create jobs to pay down our debt and deficits in a way that is fair and balanced and how to create the equality of opportunity for all of our citizens. i came away from the meeting today feeling very good about our prospects going forward. i think we are poised to do with the american people would like to see us do, a better deal for working men and women. with that, i yield to the vice chair. >> thanks, jim. thanks to the le
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 11:00pm EDT
united states. i wanted to turn now to fabiola. if you would share your thoughts with us? [ speaking spanish ] [ speaking spanish ] [ applause ] >> thank you. now we'll hear from anna, please? [ speaking spanish ] [ speaking spanish ] [ speaking spanish ] [ applause ] >> thank you, anna. lillian, can you describe for us the impact that you have seen of the immigration crisis, particularly on women and children? >> my experience is with my family, aunts, uncles, cousins. for example, my aunt just went through a hard time with her husband. she has three kids. one of the oldest one just came -- and she's been alone and suffering by herself. she's working hard. she's a strong woman. her husband left and disappeared leaving three kids -- leaving three kids and her alone. she's moved to manassas as well and is working hard every tay. but no help from anyone, anybody. we just give her support and we keep telling her to move forward. she can always move forward. and three kids is -- they're all young as well. so to see her working really hard, she has a right to be here. as well as other cou
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 6:00am EDT
that could lead us in this direction is complacency. the attitude -- way back when we thought unemployment normal was four percent, there was a time where the council of economic advisers, we said because of demographics, let's call it 4.9. it was viewed as incredibly pessimistic to say 4.9. now, we are talking about maybe 6.5. it is taking this discouraging performance and making it what we expect for the future. there is a danger to go in that direction. >> sheila -- >> i agree with that. we can do better. there is political dysfunction in washington. politicians say, this is the best we can do. i think i would agree. i think getting rid of the loopholes, expenditures, bringing the -- rate down, identifying infrastructure spending, retraining the workforce, there are things we need to do. we need to make our country more competitive so that other people want to buy. >> is it safe to say that politics is the greatest impediment to growth? will the economy be held back? >> yes.[laughter] that is the biggest obstacle. the second one is the mindset. we grow up believing that fin
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 11:00pm EDT
as an extremely fast intern, running them to us. i had tom on the phone in one ear and waiting for the intern the other out in ear. news.com te, nbc carried the scotus blog live time.at the same we're usually competing with the eyeballs with h our cases but blogs and websites covering the court in one specific way. that is it's now possible to do ost of your work covering the supreme court in your jammis. because it used to be that you ad to go to the court if you wanted to know what the case was about and pull the stack of and s off, go to your desk read them. now that's not true. you need to read all of the briefs. now you can read everything. the lower court decision, the am als court decision, the cus briefs, everything on-line. the other thing that hanged it for us, for me, anyway, is the range of commentary available. speaking of social media. i'm talking about traditional blogs. election law case, we turn to rick's election law blog. there's a sentencing case, we look at the sentencing law blog. specialty egal websites out there that offer instant analysis or instant supreme
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 9:00pm EDT
c-span town hall thanks for joining us. thanks for all your comments. the conversation continues at facebook.com/cspan. discussion continues tomorrow morning on "washington journal." we will have a look at the latest on the overnight news of violence in egypt. a guest from the center of american progress and from the cato institute talk about the constitutionality of state nullification issues. grid ands. electric its former building, and a guest from the pew research center in our america by the numbers serious. -- series. tomorrowon journal," and everyday day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. to the whitete house 2016 coverage with senator amy klobuchar, democrat of minnesota. she will receive the beacon award for hillary clinton tomorrow at the annual wingding in clear lake, iowa. live coverage of that event at 7:00 p.m. eastern. season two of "first ladies," influence and image, begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of edith roosevelt. all this month, encore presentations of season one. each weeknight at 9:00 p.m. eastern, from -- programs of every first lady from martha washin
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 6:00am EDT
. throughout history these threats have also been used to our disadvantage. think about the numerous hoops and hurdles american immigration enforcement but in the 1930s and early 1940s on scientist trying to flee europe and come to the united states to work and eventually were employed to work in a manhattan project to help win the war. there is enormous bureaucratic fear and keeping these people out because of national security. a lot of these people had ties ties to common is our alleged ties to communist. because of the fear of national security -- one of my favorite examples is there was a chinese rocket scientist. he died in 2009. he was involved with rocket research in united states in the 50s. because of the national security law that said that communist could not be employed or emigrates united states he was investigated by the fbi and they said there was enough circumstantial evidence that he had attended a communist rally 20 years before the end he was kicked out of united states and deported to communist china where he was the founder of international rocket and missile pr
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 7:00am EDT
introduce to you all dean heller's other son and his wife are with us here tonight. thank you very much. [applause] i recall reading a quotation by president kennedy that said a nation reveals itself not only by the men it produces, but the men it honors and the men it remembers. and by that standard, we as a country today very poor job because we don't remember. we didn't know this amazing, remarkable legacy of our country during the most destructive conflict in history. and we paid a horrible price for it in the years that followed, not having monuments officers. in particular, in the aftermath of the looting of the national museum of iraq in baghdad in 2003. this is one of the things that i created the monuments been foundation for the preservation of art to deal with, not only with a legacy of these great deals but put it to you so we can reestablish the united states leadership in the protection of cultural treasures. one of the things we did was interview and modern-day monuments officer, a woman, who served with distinguished, had distinguished service in the army who went t
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2013 9:00pm EDT
used the social forum to advance her husband's political agenda. what was elizabeth monroe's approach to the white house? >> she and dolley madison were great friends. they were at a very different temperaments. dolley madison was social by nature and was happy to get in her carriage and go visit all day long. elizabeth monroe wanted to stay home with her family. she was devoted to her daughter, her grandchildren, and, at the white house, that is what she really enjoyed and that is what she wanted to do. she wanted to be with her family. she did not like large crowds. she was very uncomfortable at the large receptions the president had. she was very charming in smaller groups. when there was a small circle of friends together, everyone praised her charm, her affability, her conversation, said she sparkled. just a very different type of person. >> explain washington in this time and how important social was to political. >> it is interesting. these years were known as the era of good feelings. you could probably take issue with that in the second term. by that point, we were as close t
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 1:00am EDT
way? did she attends democratic conventions? did she use her influence politically? >> we will get to that story and a few minutes. thanks for asking that. that is an important question. patricia, your question. >> hello susan. i never miss your friday night program. >> thank you. >> i wrote a book about my grandfather and there is a chapter -- my grandfather was appointed as the secretary of state. his wife is frances's closest friend in aurora. they often visited the white house. frances was the godmother to my father. i still have the long dress. my question is this -- the temperance movement? >> i lost track of catherine willard. she and frances were indeed good friends. frances introduced catherine willard to mr. baldwin. she took a temperance vow. she honored that up until the latter part of her life. >> unlike the hayes, she served alcohol. >> absolutely. >> it is not a policy issue of hers. the temperance movement was not just about temperance. they were the biggest critics of her in the first term. >> they did not like her sleeveless dresses or her low net line. they thought
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 10:30pm EDT
us. she's not going to win. we need examples and role models and her way of conducting politics, stressing building bridges and not bunkers is a model we can use for the future. >> i think she's very important as katherine says for bringing those models but also for bringing women into the political mix at a very early time period. and her conciliation or her abilities to bring people together. wouldn't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their ♪elp in this series. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> on c-span tonight, libyan activist discuss. then another chance to watch "first ladies" on the life of dolley madison. >> coming up on the next "washington journal," -- 's tomorrow night, on c-span encore presentation of "first ladies" -- is not>> campaigning allowed. you cannot do that and you cannot ask for office directly. you have
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 6:00am EDT
efforts to women and minority communities. the us is 40 minutes. >> first, to my left she was elected to the house of representatives at age 23 and is in her fourth term and is on the finance committee and has a record on leading on women's health and job growth and is a leader in the latino community. she is in her fourth term, on the finance committee and as a record of leading and women's health and job growth. she is also a leader in the latino community and has been featured on fox news latino. she has received the innovative health care pioneer award and was recognized as one of the 45 most influential women under 45 by the republican security council. i want to thank her. we also saw each other as well in new york. thank you for coming. for coming. karin agness, to my right, was the founder and president of the network of the enlightened women, the nation's premier organization for conservative university women. she is a graduate of the university of virginia for her undergrad and a law degree. not an easy law school to get into. she practices law in d.c. and is a senior fellow at
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 6:00am EDT
security force. or that the police came out and he used live ammunition and slaughtered hundreds if not thousands, depending on who you listen to, of people. and so, this is unfortunately where we are. thank you for giving me an opportunity to speak. >> thank you. on that gloriously cheerful note, we are going to open the floor to questions. if you ask a question, perhaps the best thing to do is maybe to take two questions at a time. actually, we do not have that many people. can you just identify yourself so that we know who you are? hello. >> hannah. i work for the cluster newspaper macluster newspapers. i remember there was a moment when after january 25 they were trying to purge state media of the stenographers and really, there was this schizophrenic moment where there was an editorial line on the front page that did not match page three, because of the slow pace of this. i was wondering how far that process got along before what we are seeing now. and also, what is the state of the journalism syndicate right now? >> would you like both of them to take this? >> sure. >> well, a
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 11:00pm EDT
results. >> talk about student voucher tell us how you change your thinking on this interesting topic. >> this topic gets people really riled up if you want to have the debate just bring up the word voucher. i am a democrat and have spent my entire life when i asked my dad the difference he said democrats care more about the people that have less than republican make more money and i said i made democrat and i have been ever since. so when i got to washington d.c. i had clear views about what education reform should look like right to allied with the vouchers because the democrats think they are bad because you take the money away from the pork that needed them or let -- the core that need it the most but when i arrived in washington there is a publicly funded voucher program that was about to be reauthorize so they said you are the top education official what do you think? i knew what i thought so i did not want to jump to conclusions so i would meet with the mes throughout the city and how the discussions that i had absolutely change my mind i was meeting with parents mostly low-inc
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 6:00am EDT
us how to actually pronounce strelna, and not to mention st. petersburg. the g-20, as you know, just to recap, is a gathering of leaders of 19 individual countries and the european union, which has its own seat, and then another five invited guests, including spain, singapore and a couple of african countries that i've forgotten at the moment, tanzania, i think, ethiopia and one other, and then a number of international institutions, the u.n., the imf, the oecd and others will be in attendance as well. the schedule begins, actually, with sherpa meetings, that is, the leaders' senior economic advisers, will meet starting september 2nd, together with the finance deputies, because the g- 20 is really built on a finance ministers process, as you know, and so the sherpas and finance deputies will meet in parallel and then together in the days leading up to the arrival of the leaders on the 5th in order to hammer out the communique and the deliverables, as it were, such as they are. incidentally, this will be the first summit attended by the new u.s. sherpa, caroline atkinson, who re
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote described as a discrete program, to go after people who would cause us harm, when you look at the reach of ais program, it envelops substantial number of americans. can somebody help me with the math here question mark have i missed something along the way
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote program. , think, based on what i know they will come after us and i think we need to prevent an attack wherever we can from happening. that does not mean that we
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote some people have used the old expression, locking the door after the horse has been stolen. >> i can, sir. >> i appreciate your candor.
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2013 8:00pm EDT
quote thoughtful debate about these issues. i will come that statement because this is a debate that several of us on this committee and both parties have been trying to have for years. classifiedthe briefings but you cannot talk about them. a lot of these things that should be and can be discussed. we're going to have the debate that the president called for and the executive branch has been a full partner. we need straightforward answers.
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 9:00pm EDT
that we let those who represent us on capitol hill, those who represent us in our communities, knowing that we are a force to be reckoned with. many of our messages today target today's youth and our elders. i look specifically at those new parents, our young professionals, youthful educators, and community activists. they are young enough to relate, but also established in our community, and i ask you, how will we bridge that gap? what are our next steps? because this country, in the area of civil rights, has certainly taken a turn backwards. am i depressed? no. i am energized to move forward and to be sure to see the gains that we have encountered and had to come to us, that we have had to work so hard for, are not lost. so i do ask you, one of our next steps, we created a framework, but there is so much work to be done. many of our civil rights leaders, including my husband and dr. martin luther king, were still of an age when they took the lead. with that question and mind, i challenge you to get back to community building. it is your problem, it is our problem, it is our
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 7:00am EDT
lot of poles it was revelation because they had grown up under the condit system. they were used to having to stay do things for them. suddenly here they were organizing nine days of apple events for 11 million poles to k the streets and travel to different parts of the country, and it went off without a hitch. that was quite a revelation for many poles. i think those are very important precondition for solidarity, independent trade union movement which came up the very next year. i don't think those two events are unrelated. >> host: is that religion as classical politics in opposition politics. can you really make a linkage? do you think there is a linkage between the kind of religious opposition to communist authority that the pope offered to poles and the religious opposition to the shah that the ayatollah offered to iranians? is it the same phenomenon or different country i think they're different because the pope for all of his conservatism was obsessed with human rights. john paul ii wrote quite extensively about human rights. he had suffered under both not the occupation of
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 9:00pm EDT
] ♪ >> frances cleveland was a celebrity lady unlike anyone before her. to help us understand the frances cleveland sensation sweeping the country, we begin our story inside 1600 pennsylvania avenue as a curious nation awaited the details of a 49-year-old bachelor president marrying his 21-year-old bride inside the white house for the first and only time in our launchinghistory, frances cleveland into instant celebrity. >> president grover cleveland --e down >> when president grover cleveland and his bride to be came down what was then about large staircase to the family quarters at the west end of this corridor. they would have proceeded on the hallway, the music started up at the east side behind us here, where the united states marine band was assembled. the famous john philip sousa played the wedding march as the happy couple can down the hallway. they would have passed through these doors, these very same mahogany doors. come and the room, a different chandelier here, they would have did under -- stood under the chandelier. said their vows. an enormous amount of flowers in the room b
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics, including israeli and israeli palestinian peace talks. these makers is sunday on c-span at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. >> we wrote this about a year and a half ago, it's called 10 letters. it's letters that president obama reads and i went back and found 10 of them who had written to the president. it has been a pretty good read. when that is done, then we go on to act of congress and another guy at "the washington post" and back in the 1970s there was a big difference between then and now it is just that these guys have written. collision 2012 is written and there was a similar writing back in the 2008 campaign. all the guys involved, and that is coming out in august. the other one is through the perilous fight, which is by steve bulger, also someone i used to work with closely. we look bac
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 10:00am EDT
racism in this country. only held a vision and a dream for us, but we , made inn his remarks montgomery, on the capital steps, when he asked winwood freedom, -- when asked when he answeredm come, that no lie can live forever. we must eradicate the absurd notion of the hierarchy of the human family. that is the notion that gave permission for the enslavement of millions. belief, iton, that is antiquated, it is absurd, it came about in the 1700s, when the time of the printing press came about. it was proliferated throughout the world, it was embedded in all of our systems, that somehow value --chy of immanuel kant said that people who looked like him should be at hierarchy. the the was the foundation of understanding and ignorance of those times. we have fought to eradicate racism, but we have not talked about the effects of racism. we fought a civil war, but imagine if we, the abolitionists, had shed that belief instead of the blood of hundreds of thousands of people. imagine how the world would be if there had been a concerted andrt to set things right asserted truly the equa
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 6:00am EDT
information goes i think most of us have been in the business would feel a lot a keyif we missed communications that have we intercepted it, had we interpret correctly it would have saved the lives of our citizens than if we had not taken the effort to do it. so the information is exploding. we had this nagging suspicion there may be something out there which would save the lives of our fellow citizens or those in other countries, and we are driven by trying to be able to do that, interpreted correctly, get the information to the right people to save lives. that is the motivation of 99.9% of those of us who are in that business and i think that is what our citizens ought to expect, and they get it. >> i have been given a two- minute warning so i think this will have to be the last. >> my name is chris taylor. thank you so much for your service to our nation. is it time for the national security act of 2014? is it time for us to truly sit down and talk about a national security budget, true national security budget? and with that have helped or hindered you in your previous jobs a
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 12:00am EDT
lives for us and they're asked to do their job but because of a bad policy from the top that i described from mayor bloomberg those officers can be caught in a cycle of that humiliation that they don't want to be a party of either. trouble. how you explain that you have the right to do this to people. stop and frisk never should have been allowed. bloomberg knows better than that. thatheard some people say we stop crime. i can go door to door and stick it in. we cannot do that. i wish you would emphasize that we cannot allow police officers to do that because the constitution says you cannot. >> i appreciate the point. that is one more point from the judges ruling. judge's ruling. it may lower the crime rate but it is unconstitutional. that is not where we begin, that is where we end. situation, you can lock down an entire city. in that particular situation, that made sense will stop -- sense. legal and moral problems. we cannot look at these issues through the narrow problem -- prism of what could reduce crime. we have to look at public safety and the fact that we are a democr
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 8:00am EDT
of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech ceo. today he consults with both traditional and media -- traditional and digital companies. also joining us from from our new york studio is edmund lee who is the media reporter for bloomberg news. and, mr. lee, if we could start with you, how big a deal is this sale? >> guest: well, it's a big deal in secular terms at least, in terms of numbers, in terms of finances, $250 million isn't -- it's a lot of money, but compared to a lot of media deals, it's pretty small. it's more the fact it's "the washington post," a storied brand, a storied newspaper that once helped topple a sitting u.s. president, and jeff bethos who's a well known internet billionaire, despite the fact he tends to be press shy, ironically enough. so that's the sides of this
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2013 12:00pm EDT
represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here to talk about an issue that affects us all. these united states, our united states, have been the place of dreams and opportunities for immigrants for years. this dream lives today. the opportunity to achieve this dream has become tarnished by political rhetoric and partisan politics. comprehensive immigration reform must create a path to citizenship. there are as many as 1 # 1 million immigrants aspiring to be americans living and contributing in the united states today. this path must be streamlined for dreamers brought here as young children with immigrant parents. these people are part of the drive and the will of our economy. they open shops, restauran
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 12:00pm EDT
. veterans hospital closed down. the national weather center that give us as much warning as you can give anybody about the tornadoes wouldn't be operating. so that's a pretty contentious issue. we'll also had the national debt ceiling sometime probably in mid-november. that creates not a government shutdown scenario but if you don't find a way to resolve it, sort of a, across the board 35% cut in all government agencies because you couldn't finance government. and, finally, the immigration issue has been very contentious issue. the senate has passed a bill. it's not likely to be a bill that the house will pass. the house has passed for smaller goes through committee, through judiciary committee. they have not yet come to the house floor, considering a couple of others. i think there might be a big immigration discussion late in the year. i think it will come after this government shutdown and hit the ceiling are dealt with, if at all. because the two sides are a part. it's still certainly in the mix for this year. with that, i can drone on and on but i would rather cut it off and start i
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 12:00pm EDT
be paid to us changes when we do that and they suddenly realize many times that they don't care, that there is no issue and they say find. it's almost like being at the grown-ups table because grown-ups get married and to you very is the single most important decision one does make as an adult so to be denied that ability to make that decision o course is a great disservice and it is a humiliating situation. so for us to be able to make that important decision to be legally married is the revalidating and i think people who experience that have somewhat of a similar feeling that it is a very profound experience to make the decision to be able to propose to somebody and have it the real and get married and have it be real. so far we are loving the difference. >> thank you so much. we heard earlier about the current administration setting up some benefits for couples who are married in one state and move to a state that doesn't recognize that marriage. if it is up to the administration to set those benefits, can the next one undo that? >> it depends. on immigration is by statute d
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 12:00am EDT
lot of things bush did, it is reflecting the political reality. the question for us in this us as americans, is to say, it is kind of bleak to think the united states will have to operate drones and have shady partnerships in places like yemen. it is hard work. it does not necessarily would we be willing to accept a certain inevitability as i think europeans in the 1970's accepted that there will be terrorist attacks from time to time and it's not the end of the world. this is what i think janet knap when she was department of homeland security, when she was in charge of the department of homeland security, talked about he idea of resilience. we're beginning to see some people sighing that they don't like drones either. and so we haven't really been able -- i think that the side that wants to talk about scaling back the war on terrorism at this point should also talk about the idea that it's not a false choice to quote obama from the national archives speech between liberty and security. it's a very real choice. and we should be coming to terms with that. >> i think liberty vs. se
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 6:00am EDT
. that is not a secret how you raised yourself out of poverty, you empower women. it cannot be used as a bargaining chip. the autonomy of the men and the role they play in the future of afghanistan up so the crucial, and absolutely nonnegotiable. [applause] >> you can see that for all of us, for me personally, and for everyone in this glorious space, this has been a very special, special time to hear you, your thoughts about how you create these wonderful works of fiction. and this, i think, is the greatest, the best of all. so for those who have not had the chance, the book is "and the mountains echoed." it is extraordinary. it is compelling, a morality play told over generations, set in this place but also in paris, in california, and with themes that are universal to all of us. >> i appreciate, i didn't say this backstage but i've learned so much in the program and a great admirer of yours, and your terrific at what you do. when they told me you would be doing this interview, i was really floored. it's been a real privilege. >> thank you. [applause] >> tonight on our special booktv pr
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 9:00pm EDT
the issue of slavery. to introduce us to sarah polk emma margaret taylor, and abigail fillmore, we have two historians. an author and historian in historic preservation. and a historian and legal scholar based at albany law school, the author of a biography of millard fillmore. welcome to both of you. james k. polk is sometimes described as the least known influential president. would you agree with that and why? >> is certainly not are well-known, and he is certainly important. when he was nominated for president, he had no public office. he had twice lost the governorship of tennessee. before that he had been a one term governor, and before that a member of congress. he was a lawyer, practicing law in tennessee. he was what is known as the dark horse candidate. he had hoped to get the vice president's nomination, that is what he was pushing for. and suddenly, out of nowhere polk is the presidential nominee. most people don't know who he is. he becomes president and almost immediately puts us in a position to have a war with mexico. he pushes for the war. he is prepared to declare
CSPAN
Aug 14, 2013 9:00pm EDT
regarded peer us as a failure in the office. >> it was the happiest of all presidencies. >> good evening. on this program, we learned about the final first ladies of the antebellum era. whose tenurepierce was defined by overwhelming loss. the time she and her husband are brought to the executive mansion, they have lost all fore of their young sons the next 45 minutes, we will .elve into jane pierce good evening. welcome. >> set the stage for the conversation. what are the issues that bring franklin pierce to the white house? >> the situation was dire. everything was in turmoil. there were problems between the north and south. this slavery issues. the democratic party she belongs there was a situation where they were having to find a nominee for the election. franklin pierce appeared to them to be the best that -- best bet at that time. education.use of his he had remained popular with the south. a was felt that there was good chance that he would win nomination. there was a quite -- great dear -- there was a great deal of politicking. eventually he was nominated. the 48 ballot. that was
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 1:00am EDT
breaking off the engagement. "i am now the most miserable man in the world." can either of you tell us how they finally got back together? >> yes, there was a man named francis. his wife, in effect, stepped in and said, "look. this is ridiculous. you care for each other." they reignited a friendship. they announced that very day, mary let it be known to the family that they were married in that night. edwards and his wife insisted that they have to do it at their house, etc., etc., and a great tragic irony of all of this is that it was in that same house 40 years later that his life came to end. >> our next caller in west fargo, north dakota. caller: thank you for having me. i am calling today because i wanted to know your feelings about what mary would have bought when it was time for the slaves to become free. and in minnesota, the largest mass hanging in our united states history, and being a native american from north dakota, i was just wondering. did mary know about this? and if she did, what were her feelings on this at the time? >> i have not seen anything about her response to
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 11:00pm EDT
disturbing. to get back to your point, it was just as bad or worse back then. gives us hope that maybe something can be resurrected out of this thing we are going through. any more questions? yes? >> given lindbergh's fear of getting into the public and the press, what combination of factors drove him to be one of the leaders against the war? >> u.s. really good questions. that is a really good question. charles lindbergh, one of the things about charles lindbergh he was always, whenever he took a position he always thought he was right. there was never any doubt in charles lindbergh's mind about what he should be doing or thinking. .. when i think it was the busiesti -- loci middle of mistakes, butl it was certainly the biggest mistake during that time that he made. tha he just tarnished his reputation as a result of that. his he was never happy lesson was flying. what he could do really well waa fly. do he new aviation inside now.he and getting involved in know, smething he knew nothing about was a very big mistake and ise part. part. >> after the war started, can you tell us briefly
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 10:00am EDT
living in an age of communications revolution. about what it was like 40 years ago when we used telephones on the wall, when we did not have the internet, no e- mail and no blogs and no twitter and facebook. when did we watch the news? it was once in the evening. >> and you still showed. [laughter] >> a little commercial message there. affecting the court? that's what we will talk about today. how has this affected the court and also the job of the journalist in covering the u.s. supreme court? there are questions that arise from this topic. justices more transparent in the digital age than they were before? have they come out and been more public? is the court adapting to this new media environment? in some ways, we see that because they have a website. they did not have a website 20 years ago and are we seeing the justices on the cusp of using social media. is this something we will see more of in the future? what about in terms of covering the court? -- because we have the internet, is the job of covering the court easier today? is there more information about the court? are
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2013 1:00am EDT
other side should be joining with us to use that, by the way, would drive down the national debt, would make healthcare more accessible, affordable and crete a new paradigm where patient outcome and wellness is the goal, not so much the delivery in a hodgepodge manner. and it's because the private sector now is coordinating care under the affordable healthcare act that we see the tremendous opportunity for great gain. but instead here in congress we prs on playing taste great, less filling. yet the 40th time a bill is going to be repealed. instead of saying how can we work together, trying to play got you and what is going wrong until the agency. the american people are fed up with this. we're going to go through this sha raid one more time because it's a political point that has to be made. but what the american people want to see is affordable health care, the deficit paid off. we have the framework, the context to do it. let's get it done. let's not go after these people who are trying as hard as they can to get an act in front of the american people to allow them to get the healthca
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 1:00am EDT
. she was able to use those when campaigning to get maryland to vote for john quincy adams the 1824 election. >> how about the second question, how involved was she in the politics of the time? >> it has always been murky. there is no clear why between social politicking and the process leading to x number of votes being cast. one of the great skills begin with dolly madison, who understood that more could be achieved out of the committee room, off the floor of the house, in a social setting. louisa catherine is politically and attuned figure. i don't think you would find her dictating a platform. >> john quincy was 100 years ahead of his time. was the john quincy presidency about? -- what was the john quincy presidency about? >> john quincy was 100 years ahead of his time. famously, in his first message to congress, -- remember this is a man whose legitimacy had been questioned. and yet, he introduced this breathtaking program that anticipates the new deal by 100 years. saying the federal government should in the rowboat business. there should be a national university and washingto
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 1:00am EDT
so that a handbook for the house officers could be used. they said the book they have been referencing for years was for a first lady but it was obvious from the tour why she was interested in so many things. it it was not clear why she had empathy andrest for advocacy for native americans island i wonder if your guests could explain about that. >> i think there were some indian chieftans who came to the white house to visit, and i think they made a great impression on her, and she became interested in indian welfare. and she was interested in their education. she was interested in their medical well being and health. which was a very -- it was a proper thing for her to be interested in. nobody is going to be objecting to educating children or taking care of people who were sick. so it was certainly a good thing for her to do. the indians thought of her as their great white mother. >> you talked about the first lady and the white house. >> she had connections to the johns hopkins hospital and the pediatric unit she set up. >> we'll talk about that in a minute. >> a question
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98